Plastic Safety Considerations

Dr. Jason Jensen NMD, Dr. Wendy Wells NMD.

Researchers have been working to understand exposure to plastic by-products via ingestion, inhalation and skin contact. A large number of plastic consumer products are known to contain hazardous endocrine disrupters:

sperm cell
X sperm cell illustration

Sperm Cell © illustration by Mark G Kelly

Plastic Metabolites - Current Research

Plastic phthalates can lead to altered T hormone levels, sperm DNA damage, and sperm cell death. [1]

Phthalates present in bleached white plastic containers are adsorbed by milk proteins. [2]

Phthalate were positively associated with depression risks in a representative sample of the U.S. elderly population. [3]

Phthalate Sources

Soft PVC Plasticizers:

plastic container lights
X plastic containers lights

Plastic container lights Flickr

Non-Plastic Products:

Phthalates can be released from products and exposure may occur in humans through food, dust, air and direct use of personal care products. (Janjua et al., 2008; Wittassek and Angerer, 2008; Wormuth et al., 2006)

Parabens

Antimicrobial Preservatives:

  • Personal care products
  • Cosmetics
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Preservatives in confectionary foods, dried meat

"The maximum level of parabens in cosmetics restricted by the European Cosmetic Directive to 0.4% (single ester) and 0.8% (mixture of esters) (EC, 2009)."

Triclosan

Antimicrobial Agent in Consumer Products:

  • Deodorants
  • Toothpastes
  • Mouth washes
  • Shower gels
  • Cleaning products
  • Plastics
  • Toys (Bedoux et al., 2012)

"Triclosan is approved by the European Cosmetic Directive for use in cosmetic products in concentrations up to 0.3% (EC, 2009), but is no longer permitted for use in food contact materials (EC, 2010)."

vintage glass perfume bottle
X vintage glass perfume bottle

Glass perfume bottle Nicolas Raymond

Fragrances

Phthalates are used as solvents and fixatives in perfumes. Phthalates esters were found in fragrances beyond accepted threshold limits. [6]

References

  1. Phthalate exposure in association with serum hormone levels, sperm DNA damage and spermatozoa apoptosis: A cross-sectional study in China. Environmental Research. 2015 Dec PMID:26654563Exit Site

  2. Determination of free and total phthalates in commercial whole milk products in different packaging materials by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Journal of Dairy Science. 2015 Dec PMID:26454292Exit Site

  3. Urinary phthalate metabolites and depression in an elderly population: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2012. Environmental Research. 2015 Nov PMID:26624239Exit Site

  4. Large Effects From Small Exposures - Effects of Bisphenol A on Human Exposure. Endocrinology. 2006 Jun PMID:16690810Exit Site

  5. BPA exposure during in vitro oocyte maturation results in dose-dependent alterations to embryo development rates, apoptosis rate, sex ratio and gene expression. Reproductive Toxicology. 2015 Dec PMID:26686065Exit Site

  6. Screening of phthalate esters in 47 branded perfumes. Environmental Science and Pollution Research International 2015 Aug 28. PMID:26310707Exit Site



Jason Jensen, NMD

Author Jason Jensen is a licensed naturopathic medical physician in the state of Arizona.

Say hello to Jason at Google+ | LinkedIn | Jump toWebsite Newsletter




Wendy Wells

Author Wendy Wells is a licensed naturopath physician in the state of Arizona.

Say hello and connect with Wendy at Google+ | LinkedIn | Jump toWebsite Newsletter




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