HomeHeartspring.net RemediesMedicine NaturalFood DrinkingWater

two green soya beans inside pod
Soybean (Glycine max, latin)

Why Not Soy?

By

During pregnancy in humans, isoflavones could be a risk factor for abnormal brain and reproductive tract in fetal development.

Phytoestrogens in Soy Depress Immune Function

Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (May 28, 2002;99(11):7616-7621) has raised new concerns about soy. Researchers injected mice with the soy isoflavones genistein and daidzein and then looked at the thymus gland.

They found that the injections produced dose-responsive decreases in thymic weight of up to 80 percent. In other words, the more isoflavones given, the greater decrease in the weight of the thymus gland. The genistein-injected mice showed a large decrease in the number of immune cells and changes in the thymus, where immune cells mature. Genistein decreased thymocyte numbers up to 86 percent and doubled apoptosis (cell death), indicating that the mechanism of the genistein effect on loss of thymocytes is caused in part by increased apoptosis. In addition, genistein produced suppression of humoral immunity. Genistein injected at 8 mg/kg per day produced serum genistein levels comparable to those reported in soy-fed human infants, and this dose caused significant thymic and immune changes in mice.

"Critically, dietary genistein at concentrations that produced serum genistein levels substantially less than those in soy-fed infants produced marked thymic atrophy. These results raise the possibility that serum genistein concentrations found in soy-fed infants may be capable of producing thymic and immune abnormalities, as suggested by previous reports of immune impairments in soy-fed human infants."

These results explain the frequent infections, high fevers and autoimmune problems (including diabetes) that often occur in soy-fed children. Unlike earlier reports on the negative effects of soy, this study was actually reported in a major newspaper. "A Closer Look at Soy and Babies" appeared in the Science section of the New York Times, May 21, 2002. The article quotes Dr. Paul S. Cook, head of the study, as stating that,

"Parents whose babies did not need to drink soy formula for health reasons, like allergies, should consider using milk-based formula instead, if they do not breast feed."

FDA Scientists Against Soy

Concerned FDA researchers Daniel Doerge and Daniel Sheehan, signed a letter of protest, pointing to a link between soy consumption and health problems in certain animals.

"Patients are informed of risks, and are monitored by their physicians for evidence of toxicity. There are no similar safeguards in place for foods, so the public will be put at potential risk from soy isoflavones in soy protein isolate without adequate warning and information." Health Claims: Soy Protein, FDA




Heart

are assistants of board reviewed doctors that are medical editors, authors, and reviewers, providing oversight for Heartspring.net. This article is currently undergoing doctor reveiw.




Collection of articles highlighting soy benefits.

Life-stages, perimenopause, bio-identical hormones, progesterone cream, and estriol lotion.


√Editorial TopicsSite GalleryArtwork PolicyUsage ContactContact

Updated: Dec 16 2017